1 Post A Day Challenge – ENTRY #4

Raining still. The rain is definitely a damper, I must say. When I was younger, I loved rain during weekdays and hated it on weekends. Strong rains during weekdays automatically mean no school which means longer time to sleep and I can watch the cartoons we usually miss on school days. Bad weather during weekends is just plain cruel for a 10-year old kid who loves to play outside.

The moment we step out of the house and into the yard or the street (if we’re allowed), we turn from squeaky clean to grimy, sweaty, stinky kids. All from running around and hiding in corners, dusty cabinets, or somewhere the IT can’t find us. Here are some of my top 5 childhood games:

1. Hopscotch a.k.a. PIKO

Favorite Rule: Sunog Bahay!!! *Evil Laugh*

Instead of chalk, we use pieces of broken paso (flower pots) to draw the lines and our names on our “bahay” (houses). The orange lines are way harder to erase so imagine my father’s horror when he comes home and sees our driveway full of drawings and bad hand writing.

2. Games with repeated names as titles:

2.1. Bahay – bahayan – This is basically playing house. We appoint the oldest cousin to be the mom and the only boy cousin who would play with us will be the dad and we’ll play house. We easily got bored with this so we played the next one instead.

2.2. Lutu – Lutuan – We basically pretend to be cooks. The cousins who were my age were mostly girls so during Christmas our gifts are usually the same. We always got a kitchen set. It was no fun cooking imaginary food so one time we decided to use real food like chips or nuts or whatever we can find. As soon as our moms found out we were scolded for playing with food so we eventually landed on dried leaves, flowers, and other greens we can find that will resemble vegetables. My dad had a lot of plants so we were always plucking leaves or fruits or flowers from it and he wasn’t happy about that too so we went around the block and plucked things from our neighbors’ gardens.

Julienned dried leaves and flowers? YUM! :9

2.3. Teacher – teacheran – Of course we missed school during summer breaks so we played school too! God, we were weird kids, weren’t we? Anyway, we’d appoint somebody to be the teacher and we did actual lessons like Math and Spelling. We had a little blackboard and chalk. By the end of the summer vacation we all had an-an (a skin problem from using chalk) that we cured by putting pounded ampalaya leaves on it.

 3. 10-20 (Ten Twenty)

This is one of the games we played all the time. It’s basically jumping around a garter or elastic counting by tens starting from 10 to 100. You can play by teams or individually (but you need at least 3 players or if there are only 2 players you’ll need a tree trunk or anything to hold the other end of the garter.) Here’s a better explanation from wikipidea.com:

A game involving 2 pairs, with one utilizing a stretched length of garter. One pair faces each other from a distance and has the garter stretched around them in such a way that a pair of parallel lengths of garter is between them. The members of the other pair, then begin doing a jumping “routine” over the garters while singing a song (“ten, twenty, thirty, and so on until one hundred). Each level begins with the garters at ankle-height and progresses to higher positions, with the players jumping nimbly on the garters while doing their routines.

 

Thank you google search for the photo. 🙂

10-20 Vocabulary:

a. “dead mother dead all” – if you play in teams, you usually have a mother or a leader. If the “mother” doesn’t finish the routine or doesn’t get it right, even if the other team members did it correctly they will loose a turn.

b. “saling pusa” or “saling kit-kit” – is a person who’s technically NOT part of the teams – because they’re too young to play or they sucked – but is still allowed to participate in the game because your aunts or the sitters saw you excluding him/her so they asserted their rights as adults and imposed if not ordered you all to let the him/her play.

c. “wider” – basically means you have to use your arms to widen the garter. Thin participants usually get this a lot. (Can’t paint you a pretty good picture, maybe I’ll post one when I get to play again.)

4. Sikyo (for us jologs) or Block 123 (for the coños) a.k.a Agawan Base

This one I learned to play at school. You have to be able to run fast and be swift enough to dodge the enemies cause if you get tagged you’ll be held captive. There are 2 teams with bases usually parallel from each other. You’ll have to chase each other and once you got a hold of the “enemy” they’ll end up as active waiting for their team mates to tag and save them. It would be hard to save team mates because of guards waiting to run after you and tag you as well.

Unang Kawal Ako!!!

5. Patintero

This is my favorite game of all time. You need a big open space where you have to draw six boxes at least (3 rows and 2 columns). Players stand and guard the lines and they should prevent the other team players to cross those line. If you one of you gets tagged all of your team mates will be IT.

“Patotot” is what we call the player who guards the line in the middle that intersects all the lines. 🙂

When I was in 6th grade, my classmates and I would play this all the time. We actually kept score and called it a tournament. We used the open space beside the old church (which is now the Shrine of St. Therese) and we’d team up, run around and try to catch the opposing teams until our lungs give out and our knees give in to exhaustion.

I had a pretty great childhood. Unlike the kids of today who sprain their fingers swiping away in their iPads and straining their eyes from too much TV or social networking – which actually in a way is anti-social because instead of talking personally they just text or tweet each other – my childhood was all about getting down and dirty…literally. It was so much fun to run around, be free, and be a kid and play outside. Scratched knees and bruises were all worth it. I wouldn’t trade the scars and awesome stories and friends for anything else.

 

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